Hello! My name is Doobie Moseley and I’m the main person behind Easy Live Blog. This project was created out of necessity. I’m the co-owner of a website for Disney fans called LaughingPlace.com. We love to live blog there as we find it to be a very straightforward way to cover a story as it happens whether it be Comic-Con, a movie premiere, a theme park attraction opening or just an episode of a TV show. Anything can be covered with a Disney twist and that’s always our goal.

We looked at the paid solutions out there but couldn’t justify their cost. So me being a coder, I decided to write my own.

Unfortunately, the free live blog platform we were using wasn’t reliable enough. Too often we’d have troubles logging in or our social posts wouldn’t embed properly. We also wanted it to be easier to follow others on Twitter and embed their content in our live blog. We looked at the paid solutions out there but couldn’t justify their cost. So me being a coder, I decided to write my own.

After fooling around here in there with the basics of live blog communication, I began serious coding in May. We first used it internally on July 4th and our first big tests were live blogging the D23 Expo last weekend and San Diego Comic-Con this weekend. So far we’re happy with the results.

With that deadline met, it was time to put development on the back burner and marketing on the front.  Yesterday our landing page went up at EasyLiveBlog.com explaining the product and asking for an email address for more information and early access. Today I sent a few tweets thanking some of the podcasters I listen to that have instructed and inspired me (Startups For the Rest of Us, Rogue Startups and IndieHackers.com) and began the process of collecting websites and email addresses for cold email marketing.

Cronometer “started as a … project to scratch my own itch, and eventually there was a clear signal that there was a market demand” — IndieHackers.com

One of the lessons learned at the sites was to work in the space that you know. An obvious way to do that is to build a product that solves a problem you have, something known as “scratching your own itch.” And sometimes that process can lead to great success as it has for Cronometer, a product featured on IndieHackers.com now making over $40,000 / month, that “started as a personal hobby project to scratch my own itch, and eventually there was a clear signal that there was a market demand for it.”

The goal is to have an MVP (Minimum Viable Product) by the end of August, but that’s the easiest part. As any coder knows, the marketing is the hard part and I hope to have a decent sized mailing list to market to when the MVP is ready using all the techniques I’ve heard on the podcasts above and elsewhere.

I’m going to do my best to chronicle those behind the scenes adventures here. If you have any questions, comments or suggestions, please pass them along. I can be reached at info@EasyLiveBlog.com.